Vegetables juice diet

What is the Juice Diet and is it Effective for Weight Loss?
Heather Christo - Sharing the love of food with friends and family

How does the juice diet work?

Juice diets involve consuming only juice and no solid foods for varying amounts of time from a few days to months in extreme cases. Basically it involves throwing a heap of vegetables and fruit in the blender or juicer at every meal and consuming only this. Commercially produced juices are not allowed as only fresh unpasteurized juices are considered appropriate for the diet.

The idea behind the diet is that drinking only juice will ‘detox’ the body and get rid of harmful toxins that have built up in our body and are stored in fat. It is also advertised as a get thin quick very low calorie diet, which people presume is healthy as it is based on fruit and vegetables.

A lot of people also remove the pulp from juices, thus removing all the fibre and leaving a drink that is little more than water, sugar and some nutrients.

There are also more extreme claims such as that a juice diet can cure cancer.

Will it cause weight loss?

A juice diet is very low in calories and as such may cause weight loss fairly quickly initially. However, this reduction is likely to be mainly contributed to water loss. If followed in the long term, weight loss will probably result, however, due to the low energy content of the diet; this may well be muscle loss as the body simply does not have enough energy or protein to build muscle.

Reduced muscle mass has the effect of slowing down your metabolism, as does reducing your calorie intake to a very low level.

Your body is then more likely to store energy rather than burn it as it perceives itself to be in a state of fasting, meaning that when you start to eat normal food again it is likely that you will regain all the weight lost and possibly a bit extra quite quickly.

This type of diet has a similar effect to yo-yo dieting when weight is lost, and then regained rapidly as soon as the diet is finished.

Is there any evidence?

There are no scientific studies investigating the effects of juice diets on weight loss and general health. Many followers of juice diets report great weight loss and ‘feeling healthier’, however it is likely that large amounts of initial weight loss are due to water loss.

There is no evidence suggesting that detox diets of this type are necessary for the body, which is well equipped with its own systems, the liver, kidney and digestive system, for eliminating harmful substances from the body.

The American cancer council has stated that there is no evidence to support the use of fasting diets to treat cancer. In fact the lack of protein is likely to be detrimental to those undergoing cancer treatments that often require increased energy and protein diets to maintain their body weight and fight the illness.

The one benefit that may come from a juice diet is an increase in fruit and vegetable intake, providing valuable vitamins and minerals that may not be consumed on a daily basis.

Is it safe?

A one day detox or even one that continues a few days will probably not be harmful for the majority of healthy people. However, there are still likely to be some undesirable side effects such as lack of energy, headaches, hunger and frequent bathroom trips.

Source: www.caloriesecrets.net


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Vegan& vegetarian sources of important nutrients

2010-04-04 14:53:53 by Bacall


Calcium
Vegetarians should consume a variety of calcium sources in order to meet daily requirements. Studies have shown vegetarians absorb and retain more calcium from foods than do non-vegetarians.
If dairy products are not included in your diet, adequate amounts of calcium can be obtained from plant foods. Here are some other vegetarian-friendly sources of calcium:
* Fortified soymilk or rice milk
* Leafy green vegetables
* Broccoli
* Beans
* Calcium-fortified juice
* Calcium-set tofu
* Almonds and almond butter
* Sesame seeds and sesame butter (tahini)
* Soy nuts
* Blackstrap...

Juicing answered

2013-08-02 16:14:30 by Winterghost2002

Look, most people don't know much about the benefits of juicing, so they'll dismiss it as just another fad diet, a fiber-less drink, and other what nots...but the truth is that there's plenty of protein along with a ton of other nutrients available in the juices, depending on what you're juicing...no V8s are a waste of time, canned juices don't even come close to what one can make at home...and the juicers are not even that expensive...I got mine for 45 bucks and have had it for a year and a half...I've done a ton of research on this matter and juicing fruits and vegetables makes sense...Look, think of liquids like alcohol and coffee

Doctor's dietary restrictions: No sugar or cow

2005-02-12 18:47:24 by drydrunk

Well, help me out here.
i usually eat for breakfast yogurt with flax and fruit juice. i can still eat the goat yogurt with psyllium husk, but i can't figure out what to do about the sweetener. just go no sweetener? any alternatives to this quick breakfast i can eat while i drive to work that takes no time to prepare?
she said i should snack every 2-3 hours on high protein foods. HELP! my idea of a snack is fruit, or sugar and i can't eat it. Besides the obvious suggestion of vegetables, can anyone offer any concrete suggestions? I am seriously at a loss of how to manage this diet


V8 V8 Low Sodium 100% Vegetable Juice, Six 5.5 Ounce Cans (Pack of 8)
Grocery (V8)
  • Pack of eight six-packs of 5.5 ounce cans of juice (total of 48 cans, 264 ounces)
  • Nutritious blend of tomatoes, carrots, celery, beets, parsley, lettuce, watercress and spinach
  • Gluten free and excellent source of vitamin C and A
  • Excellent source of potassium and low sodium
  • Two serving of vegetables in every glass
  • 70% less sodium
  • Also has an excellent source of potassium
  • Pack of 8, 33-ounce units
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Fruit and Vegetable Juice Diet: Day 3
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Fruit and Vegetable Juice Diet: Day 2
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