Eating vegetable glycerin

Side Effects Of Vegetable Glycerin

Vegetable glycerin, used in many oral medications, can cause adverse effects. Photo Credit Images

Vegetable glycerin, also called glycerol, is a type of liquid derived from a variety of vegetable oils and is used in various applications throughout the food-processing and pharmaceutical industries for its potential health benefits. In the food industry, glycerin is used as a preservative and sweetener, while the pharmaceutical industry uses it as a binding agent and lubricant in various medications. Despite its potential benefits, vegetable glycerin may cause adverse effects in some people. If you believe you are sensitive to glycerin, talk to your doctor.

While most forms of vegetable glycerin have a relatively low toxicity, some forms, especially propylene glycol, can have toxic effects when consumed in high quantities. According to the World Health Organization, too much propylene glycol can cause excess lactate to build up in the bloodstream and can lead to coma, convulsions and cardiovascular problems such as heart attack. However, the amount required to cause these reactions is high, making an overdose unlikely.

Some forms of vegetable glycerin may cause allergic reactions, especially if you are sensitive to oils, such as coconut and palm oil. Some vegetable glycerin compounds also contain sulfites, which are infused in the oil to extend the shelf life of the product, especially in the food manufacturing industry. According to the Cleveland Clinic, a sensitivity to sulfite can cause asthma-like symptoms and a generalized allergic reaction.

Some vegetable glycerins and glycols are known skin irritants, according to the book "Clinical Practice of Emergency Medicine." When raw vegetable glycerins come in contact with your skin, they may cause skin allergies. Glycerin interacts with the natural oils on the surface of the skin and may cause itching and the appearance of hives or a rash. Washing your skin thoroughly with soap and water can help remove any vegetable glycerin remaining on your skin and help treat a skin reaction.

Vegetable glycerins can irritate your respiratory system and gastrointestinal tract. If vegetable glycerin is accidentally inhaled, it can irritate the mucous membranes in the lungs and cause wheezing, swelling of the tongue and upper respiratory tract infections. High amounts of oral vegetable glycerin can upset your stomach and result in nausea, diarrhea and in rare cases inflammation of your gastrointestinal tract, called gastroenteritis.

Source: www.livestrong.com


H&B Oils Center Co. Olive Oil Extra Virgin Organic Carrier Cold Pressed Pure 4 oz
Beauty (H&B Oils Center Co.)
  • Extra-Virgin Olive Oil is used predominantly in cooking
  • It is delicate and suitable for cooking as well as eating raw on salad, vegetables, meat and fish
  • Extra-virgin olive oil is the most digestible of the edible fats and: it helps to assimilate vitamins A, D and K
  • It slows down the aging process; it helps bile, liver and intestinal functions
  • Extra-Virgin Olive Oil is used in the manufacturing of cosmetics and soaps

You might also like:

Does The Cabbage Soup Diet Work? …
Does The Cabbage Soup Diet Work? …
does caveman diet really work - paleo …
does caveman diet really work - paleo …
Lemonade Diet - Does the Lemonade Diet …
Lemonade Diet - Does the Lemonade Diet …

This helped me

2005-01-16 15:33:24 by marynkab

I did two things simultaneously, so I don't know which one worked, but I have virtually gotten rid of those little bumps. I stopped eating dairy. Not 100%, but I probably have the equivalent of a day's worth in the whole week. I also switched from dove soap to essential oil soap with a vegetable glycerin base. A month later I have almost no bumps, yippee! :)

If you care about your dog's nutrition

2008-03-25 06:34:53 by Dogo4UK

Everlasting Treat Balls aren't exactly a good choice. Of course if you don't mind your dog eating wheat, corn, gluten and various other nasties, I guess they're okay.
Everlasting Treat ingredients:
Chicken Refill: Wheat gluten, gelatine, water, glycerin, natural flavoring, corn gluten meal, garlic powder, brewers yeast, lecithin, sodium diacetate, vegetable gum, titanium dioxide, natural coloring.
Liver Refill: Wheat gluten, gelatine, water, glycerin, natural flavoring, corn gluten meal, garlic powder, brewers yeast, lecithin, sodium diacetate, vegetable gum, titanium dioxide, natural coloring


paleo diet book reviews - does paleo diet …
paleo diet book reviews - does paleo diet …
Fast Weight Loss Diet: Does Calorie …
Fast Weight Loss Diet: Does Calorie …
Does Fat Loss Factor Work? Fat Loss …
Does Fat Loss Factor Work? Fat Loss …

Related posts:

  1. Eating Vegetables Quotes
  2. Diet Vegetable soup
  3. Raw food vegetables Dip recipe
  4. Diet Vegetable Recipes